at Active.Modules.Social.SocialBase.get_SocialUser() at Active.Modules.Social.Controls.SocialWelcome.Page_Load(Object sender, EventArgs e)
Online Archaeology
Get the Online Archaeology app from the Apple iPhone Store now

Get the Online Archaeology app now!

Archaeology Books
Minimize
Search
Archaeology: A Very Short Introduction 2/e (Very Short Introductions)
Archaeology: A Very Short ...
by: Paul Bahn
Amazon Price: £6.79
Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Practice
Archaeology: Theories, Methods and ...
by: Colin Renfrew, Paul ...
Amazon Price: £28.46
Archaeology: An Introduction
Archaeology: An Introduction
by: Kevin Greene, Tom ...
Amazon Price: £27.51
Archaeology for Kids: Uncovering the Mysteries of Our Past, 25 Activities
Archaeology for Kids: Uncovering the ...
by: Richard Panchyk
Amazon Price: £14.50
The Archaeology Coursebook: An Introduction to Themes, Sites, Methods and Skills
The Archaeology Coursebook: An ...
by: Jim Grant
Amazon Price: £24.08
Archaeology of the Bible
Archaeology of the Bible
by: Jean-Pierre Isbouts
Amazon Price: £17.18
Archaeology for Dummies
Archaeology for Dummies
by: Nancy Marie White
Amazon Price: £14.99
The Archaeology of Disease
The Archaeology of Disease
by: Charlotte Roberts
Amazon Price: £18.99
The Archaeology of Britain
The Archaeology of Britain
by:
Amazon Price: £23.79
A Practical Handbook of Archaeology: A Beginner's Guide to Unearthing the Past
A Practical Handbook of Archaeology: ...
by: Christopher Catling
Amazon Price: £8.99
Online Archaeology Forums
Minimize
Would like some help interpreting this survey..
Last Post 16 Mar 2013 08:03 AM by simon.d. 2 Replies.
AddThis - Bookmarking and Sharing Button Printer Friendly
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Sort:
NextNext
You are not authorized to post a reply.
Author Messages
simon.dUser is Offline
New Member
New Member
Send Private Message
Posts:2
simon.d

--
24 Nov 2012 09:23 PM
Over the last few months I've been experimenting with an aerial photogrammetric technique to record earthworks in 3d. The process starts with a remote controlled aircraft with camera attached, and a 100+ photos later of the earthworks in question, the photos are computationally processed to generate a 3d model of surface topography..

The site I'm currently looking at is next to Ballymoon Castle in Co. Carlow, Ireland. There are earthworks clearly visible on bing's satelite imagery of the site here: Satelite Image .. The best way I've found to present these models is output an animation with light direction varied over time as shown below:
Animation
Animation

The site itself has an Anglo norman moated site partially depicted on the extreme left above ( or the vegetation covered square feature to the north in the satelite image), and a Castle  (Ballymoon castle) the corner of which is depicted on right edge of the animation above. I'm trying to figure out what's going on the middle and any help would be most appreciated..

Here's a different type of output, (a plot of surface normals) which similarly highlight some of the features...
Surface Normals
dutyfreeUser is Offline
New Member
New Member
Send Private Message
Posts:2
mikeyc

--
29 Nov 2012 01:23 AM
Hi, this is exactly the method of landscape research I'm looking into and I'd be very interested to learn more of the model airplane, camera and software you use.

Regarding your query, a quick look at the area over at http://webgis.archaeology.ie/Nation...lexViewer/ and a query there gives little help other than what you've already discovered - there is a record of the earthworks between the moated site and the squarish castle site but no more info to help understand what they are. Note though that rock art is known south of the castle near the road and that there's a recorded mound just to the south east of the castle in the corner of the field. Also, further south east over the road is a recorded enclosure. It appears to be elongated oval in shape. West of this in the same field a cist was found. OK this isn't exactly the area your survey covered but it may help unravel what you have.

What I'd do with the imagery next is map out all of the features you can discern from the imagery. I use Mapmaker for this sort of thing or Globalmapper if I want to get really stuck in. All your linear features, enclosures and bumps can be mapped fairly easily. The tricky bit is to then attempt to date things. The easiest way for that with what you have might be to simply assign a tentative relative chronology to the features you map. For example, looking at the imagery it seems to me you have a set of modernish field boundaries (which could all be assigned modern in your map) overlaying enclosure(s), possible mounds and field boundaries or linear(ish) features. You also have at least two knowns, the Anglo Norman stuff. So you can have a provisional map with modern, Anglo Norman and the rest. Presumably you'll be able to have a look at some of this stuff at ground level in which case you can attempt to determine which features are on top of others and so you might be able to firm up the chronologies of 'the rest'. If you can't do that you can at least filter out the modern features from your map and look at the elements remaining - it's surprising how just doing that can lead to a better understanding of a site/landscape especially if the elements you've mapped appear somehow related.

Dates: well without excavation you'll never be sure and the info at present isn't enought o date anything but given the rock art, oval(ish) enclosure, mounds etc you could have quite a complicated multiperiod landscape. The fields/liinears could be remnants of early med farming or maybe fields associated with an Early Christian site, more likely they post-date the Anglo Norman though. Do let me know how you get on or have queries and do please let me know about the tools you're using, cheers, Mike.

simon.dUser is Offline
New Member
New Member
Send Private Message
Posts:2
simon.d

--
16 Mar 2013 08:03 AM
Apologies about the delay in reply dutyfree,and thanks for the feedback

The image below is the plane I'm using, a Radian Parkzone.. Very easy to fly, with only a rudder and elevator (no flaps or ailerons to be worrying about). Can be hand launched, and caught, so very flexible in terms of where you can fly from. 2m wingspan, so can carry point and shoot cameras very easily... Critically it's slow flying, and can hang stationary when flown into a bit of a breeze, so motion blur isn't much of an issue.




Camera wise, I'm using a canon powershot camera. The critical aspect of this series of camera is that the firmware has been hacked by chdk, which provides you with very high levels of control over settings, and the capacity to run scripts. So shutter speed can be upped (to minimise motion blur) and intervalometer script can be run to make the camera continually shoot away at a specified time interval while in flight. The CHDK website lists which models are compatible with the firmware hack, so take care in choosing one that is supported. Suitable cameras can be picked up on ebay second hand for €40 or €50.

Most recent capture was a multivallate site in Co. Kilkenny, here in Ireland. Try to publish most of this stuff on my blog, aerialarchaeology.blogspot.com

You are not authorized to post a reply.

Go to email Go to delicious.com Go to digg Go to technorati Go to reddit Go to stumbleupon Go to facebook Go to newsvine Go to simpy Go to google bookmarks Go to yahoo bookmarks Go to yahoo myweb Go to ask Go to slashdot Go to rawsugar Go to mister-wong Go to backflip Go to diigo Go to tailrank Go to live Go to twitter Go to fark Go to blogmarks Go to linkagogo Go to wink Go to ma.gnolia Go to bluedot Go to netvouz Go to blinklist Go to sphinn
Home · Connect · Contribute
Copyright 2013 Online Archaeology   |   Terms of Use   |   Privacy Statement