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ADS - New Collections
June 2010: Developing Magnetometer Techniques to Identify Submerged Archaeological Sites
Marine magnetic surveying has become a standard technique for mapping the location of ferrous material on the seabed. The aim of the project was to acquire a better understanding of magnetic data and thus develop our ability to interpret these data with increased confidence.
20 Apr 2014
ADS
November 2011: York Archaeology wins Queen's Anniversary Prize
The Department of Archaeology at York University, which hosts the ADS, has been given a Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education. Introduced following the 40th Anniversary of the Queen's reign in 1992, the prizes, which rank alongside the Queen's Awards for Industry are awarded biennially for 'work of exceptional quality and of broad benefit either nationally or internationally'. This is the fifth to be conferred on the university in 15 years, only the second time it has been awarded to a whole Department.
20 Apr 2014
Google Maps Mania
Were Could You Afford to Live in Texas?
The Texas Affordability Index is a handy mapped guide to where you can afford to live in Texas. To find areas in Texas where you could afford to rent a property simply select your job from the drop-down menu and the amount of space you wish to rent and the map will show you where you can and cannot afford to live. The map allows you to enter a number of parameters concerning your income and
18 Apr 2014
The Map Room
The Only Fantasy World Map You'll Ever Need
The Only Fantasy World Map You'll Ever Need by Jake Manley isn't the first map of its kind that I've seen (see also the map in Diana Wynne Jones's Tough Guide to Fantasyland); still, it's clear that...

(Click through to read the entire post.)
16 Apr 2014
Open Objects
How can we connect museum technologists with their history?
A quick post triggered by an article on the role of domain knowledge (knowledge of a field) in critical thinking, Deep in thought:
Domain knowledge is so important because of the way our memories work. When we think, we use both working memory and long-term memory. Working memory is the space where we take in new information from our environment; everything we are consciously thinking about is held there. Long-term memory is the store of knowledge that we can call up into working memory when we need it. Working memory is limited, whereas long-term memory is vast. Sometimes we look as if we are using working memory to reason, when actually we are using long-term memory to recall. Even incredibly complex tasks that seem as if they must involve working memory can depend largely on long-term memory.
When we are using working memory to progress through a new problem, the knowledge stored in long-term memory will make that process far more efficient and successful. ... The more parts of the problem that we can automate and store in long-term memory, the more space we will have available in working memory to deal with the new parts of the problem.
A few years ago I defined a 'museum technologist' as 'someone who can appropriately apply a range of digital solutions to help meet the goals of a particular museum project', and deep domain knowledge clearly has a role to play in this (also in the kinds of critical thinking that will save technologists from being unthinking cheerleaders for the newest buzzword or geek toy). 

There's a long history of hard-won wisdom, design patterns and knowledge (whether about ways not to tender for or specify software, reasons why proposed standards may or may not work, translating digital methods and timelines for departments raised on print, etc - I'm sure you all have examples) contained in the individual and collective memory of individual technologists and teams. Some of it is represented in museum technology mailing lists, blogs or conference proceedings, but the lessons learnt in the past aren't always easily discoverable by people encountering digital heritage issues for the first time. And then there's the issue of working out which knowledge relates to specific, outdated technologies and which still holds while not quashing the enthusiasm of new people with a curt 'we tried that before'...

Something in the juxtaposition of the 20th anniversary of BritPop and the annual wave of enthusiasm and discovery from the international Museums and the Web (#MW2014) conference prompted me to look at what the Museums Computer Group (MCG) and Museum Computer Network (MCN) lists were talking about in April five and ten years ago (i.e. in easily-accessible archives):
Five years ago in #musetech - open web, content distribution, virtualisation, wifi https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?A1=ind0904&L=mcg&X=498A43516F310B2193http://mcn.edu/pipermail/mcn-l/2009-April/date.html
Ten years ago in #musetech people were talking about knowledge organisation and video links with schools https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?A1=ind04&L=mcg&F=&S=&X=498A43516F310B2193
Some of the conversations from that random sample are still highly relevant today, and more focused dives into various archives would probably find approaches and information that'd help people tackling current issues.

So how can we help people new to the sector find those previous conversations and get some of this long-term memory into their own working memory? Pointing people to search forms for the MCG and MCN lists is easy, some of the conference proceedings are a bit trickier (e.g. search within the museumsandtheweb.com) and there's no central list of museum technology blogs that I know of. Maybe people could nominate blog posts they think stand the test of time, mindful of the risk of it turning into a popularity/recency thing?

If you're new(ish) to digital heritage, how did you find your feet? Which sites or communities helped you, and how did you find them? Or if you have a new team member, how do you help them get up to speed with museum technology? Or looking further afield, which resources would you send to someone from academia or related heritage fields who wanted to learn about building heritage resources for or with specialists and the public?
13 Apr 2014
Megalithic Portal
Laiji Tsou ceremonial site

. A wooden phallic symbol stands in a valley of Laiji, a Tsou tribe village. The wooden device points to the Mt. Ta, a holy mountain on which the goddess named Tancahae lives.
13 Apr 2014
mapperz blog
UK Air Pollution Forecast Map
UK Air Pollution Forecast Map New National Mapping Website showing air pollution: More Detailed Local Pollution Monitoring  Map http://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/forecasting/  Mapperz...

Map and GIS News finding blog. With so many Maps and GIS sites online now it is hard to find the good from the not so good. This blog tries to cut the cream and provide you with the newest, fastest, cleanest and most user friendly maps that are available online. News has location and it is mapped.
31 Mar 2014
Wessex Archaeology: Events
Prehistoric Half Term Club

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Are you looking for something fun to do this half term?
Then look no further than the prehistoric half term club at the Beeches Community Centre in Bulford. Come and join the team and take part in games, bush craft activities, Stone Age cookery and much more!
 
This club is for children aged 7-11
and is completely FREE.
It will run from 10am-12pm on:
 
Monday 28th October
Tuesday 29th October
Wednesday 30th October
 
If you have any questions, or to book a place for your child, please contact Amy Pugh, from the Army Welfare Service, on 07785 357065. Early booking is advisable. 
 

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This innovative and fun event is being organised by the Army Welfare Service, English Heritage and Wessex Archaeology. 
 
 
25 Oct 2013
UK Archaeology Conferences
In, Out and In Between: Dynamics of Cultural Borders
17/10/2012-19/10/2012: Session focussing on dialectical relations between culture, social relations and landscape, with special interest in the reflections of ethnic boundaries in material culture..
03 Jul 2012
Computing, GIS and Archaeology in the UK
Portable GIS vs OSGeo Live
Over the last couple of weeks, a few people have asked me the same question, which is (to paraphrase) “what’s the difference between Portable GIS and OSGeo Live or USB GIS?”. You get asked something once, and that’s fine, but more than that and it’s worth a blog post! The main difference between the two [...]
23 Mar 2012
Archaeology News
Scientists discover Oetzi's last meal
Oetzi's body was discovered in 1991 inside a glacier near the mountainous border between Italy and Austria, where it had been naturally mummified about 5300 years ago. Previous analysis concluded...
18 Dec 2011
Archaetech
Digital Approaches to Cartographic Heritage
I’ll be giving a paper on Ptolemy at the ICA annual workshop on Digital Approaches to Cartographic Heritage at the Hague and it’s been a great excuse to finally put some ideas (old and new) down on paper. Comments welcome!      
12 Mar 2011
Professional GIS / GPS Developers Google Group
New stable version of gvSIG Desktop available: gvSIG 1.9
A new stable version of gvSIG Desktop has been released: gvSIG Desktop
1.9.

It's available on the Downloads section of the gvSIG website:
[link].

This new version has many new features which are listed next.

12 Nov 2009
Online Archaeology Blog
OPEN ARCHIVE - a new web based system for accessing our past
The wealth of information gathered by local archaeological groups and societies on excavations, surveys and documentary research is one of the important sources of data for the study of archaeology in the UK. Currently, this archive of British archaeology is stored locally, within libraries and local history centres as well as with the originating group [...]
16 Sep 2009
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