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ADS - New Collections
June 2010: Developing Magnetometer Techniques to Identify Submerged Archaeological Sites
Marine magnetic surveying has become a standard technique for mapping the location of ferrous material on the seabed. The aim of the project was to acquire a better understanding of magnetic data and thus develop our ability to interpret these data with increased confidence.
25 Oct 2014
ADS
November 2011: York Archaeology wins Queen's Anniversary Prize
The Department of Archaeology at York University, which hosts the ADS, has been given a Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education. Introduced following the 40th Anniversary of the Queen's reign in 1992, the prizes, which rank alongside the Queen's Awards for Industry are awarded biennially for 'work of exceptional quality and of broad benefit either nationally or internationally'. This is the fifth to be conferred on the university in 15 years, only the second time it has been awarded to a whole Department.
25 Oct 2014
Google Maps Mania
700 Red Dots & 4,000 Holes
Clickhole has created a static map of 700 Red Dots in the USA. The map is an effective visualization of a remarkable number of red dots throughout the US. However the use of a static map does mean that the exact location of each red dot is a little hard to read. The map would be a lot more effective if you were able to zoom in and pan the map. The 700 Red Dots map is a great example of a map
23 Oct 2014
Megalithic Portal
Haugar Barrows

. Round Barrows in Vestfold, Norway. Located in the middle of the town of Sarpsborg, this site consists of two huge round barrows. The barrows are located in a public park which has grassy lawns and some larger leaf trees. The park is on a elevated low hill overlooking the town.
18 Oct 2014
Open Objects
In which I am awed by the generosity of others, and have some worthy goals
A quick update from my CENDARI fellowship working on a project that's becoming 'In their own words: linking lived experiences of the First World War'. I've spent the week reading (again a mixture of original diaries and letters, technical stuff like ontology documentation and also WWI history forums and 'amateur' sites) and writing. I put together a document outlining a rang of possible goals and some very sketchy tech specs, and opened it up for feedback. The goals I set out are copied below for those who don't want to delve into detail. The commentable document, 'Linking lived experiences of the First World War': possible goals and a bunch of technical questions goes into more detail.

However, the main point of this post is to publicly thank those who've helped by commenting and sharing on the doc, on twitter or via email. Hopefully I'm not forgetting anyone, as I've been blown away by and am incredibly grateful for the generosity of those who've taken the time to at least skim 1600 words (!). It's all helped me clarify my ideas and find solutions I'm able to start implementing next week. In no order at all - at CENDARI, Jennifer Edmond, Alex O'Connor, David Stuart, Benjamin Štular, Francesca Morselli, Deirdre Byrne; online Andrew Gray @generalising; Alex Stinson @ DHKState; jason webber @jasonmarkwebber; Alastair Dunning @alastairdunning; Ben Brumfield @benwbrum; Christine Pittsley; Owen Stephens @ostephens; David Haskiya @DavidHaskiya; Jeremy Ottevanger @jottevanger; Monika Lechner @lemondesign; Gavin Robinson ‏@merozcursed; Tom Pert @trompet2 - thank you all!

Worthy goals (i.e. things I'm hoping to accomplish, with the help of historians and the public; only some of which I'll manage in the time)

At the end of this project, someone who wants to research a soldier in WWI but doesn't know a thing about how armies were structured should be able to find a personal narrative from a soldier in the same bit of the army, to help them understand experiences of the Great War.

Hopefully these personal accounts will provide some context, in their own words, for the lived experiences of WWI. Some goals listed are behind-the-scenes stuff that should just invisibly make personal diaries, letters and memoirs more easily discoverable. It needs datasets that provide structures that support relationships between people and documents; participatory interfaces for creating or enhancing information about contemporary materials (which feed into those supporting structures), and interfaces that use the data created.
More specifically, my goals include:
  • A personal account by someone in each unit linked to that unit's record, so that anyone researching a WWI name would have at least one account to read. To populate this dataset, personal accounts (diaries, letters, etc) would need to be linked to specific soldiers, who can then be linked to specific units. Linking published accounts such as official unit histories would be a bonus. [Semantic MediaWiki]
  • Researched links between individual men and the units they served in, to allow their personal accounts to be linked to the relevant military unit. I'm hoping I can find historians willing to help with the process of finding and confirming the military unit the writer was in. [Semantic MediaWiki]
  • A platform for crowdsourcing the transcription and annotation of digitised documents. The catch is that the documents for transcription would be held remotely on a range of large and small sites, from Europeana's collection to library sites that contain just one or two digitised diaries. Documents could be tagged/annotated with the names of people, places, events, or concepts represented in them. [Semantic MediaWiki??]
  • A structured dataset populated with the military hierarchy (probably based on The British order of battle of 1914-1918) that records the start and end dates of each parent-child relationship (an example of how much units moved within the hierarchy)
  • A published webpage for each unit, to hold those links to official and personal documents about that unit in WWI. In future this page could include maps, timelines and other visualisations tailored to the attributes of a unit, possibly including theatres of war, events, campaigns, battles, number of privates and officers, etc. (Possibly related to CENDARI Work Package 9?) [Semantic MediaWiki]
  • A better understanding of what people want to know at different stages of researching WWI histories. This might include formal data gathering, possibly a combination of interviews, forum discussions or survey 

Goals that are more likely to drop off, or become quick experiments to see how far you can get with accessible tools:

  • Trained 'named entity recognition' and 'natural language processing' tools that could be run over transcribed text to suggest possible people, places, events, concepts, etc [this might drop off the list as the CENDARI project is working on a tool called Pineapple (PDF poster). That said, I'll probably still experiment with the Stanford NER tool to see what the results are like] 
  • A way of presenting possible matches from the text tools above for verification or correction by researchers. Ideally, this would be tied in with the ability to annotate documents 
  • The ability to search across different repositories for a particular soldier, to help with the above.



17 Oct 2014
mapperz blog
Ordnance Survey Minecraft [Version 2] map of Great Britain [Video]
Ordnance Survey Minecraft map of Great Britain Video by Leigh Dodds Ordnance Survey Minecraft data is available from  http://download.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/minecraft/OSGB.zip (1GB File!) OS...

Map and GIS News finding blog. With so many Maps and GIS sites online now it is hard to find the good from the not so good. This blog tries to cut the cream and provide you with the newest, fastest, cleanest and most user friendly maps that are available online. News has location and it is mapped.
17 Oct 2014
The Map Room
Moon and Comet Maps
Maps of planets, moons and other objects in our solar system always get me excited, though truth be told they were among the less popular posts on my old Map Room blog. Here are a couple of rather...

(Click through to read the entire post.)
08 Oct 2014
Archaetech
Without a federal UK, a reluctant ‘Yes’
Like many other Scots resident outside Scotland, I have been following the referendum intently with a mixture of pride, envy and angst. Proud that as a nation it has engaged so fully in debate, envy that I (rightly) couldn’t take part, and angst because even now I find it hard to decide upon a vote I […]
17 Sep 2014
Wessex Archaeology: Events
Barrow Clump Open Day

1725

As part of the Festival of Archaeology this summer, discover the amazing archaeology at Barrow Clump, a Bronze Age burial mound and Saxon cemetery being excavated by injured Service personnel and veterans as part of Operation Nightingale.
 
 
 

1720

 
Free entry
Saturday 19th July 2014 
11am - 4pm
No need to book, all ages welcome
 
  • Witness the archaeological excavation
  • Come face to face with Saxon warriors 
  • Handle replica Saxon artefacts with Wiltshire Museum
  • Meet Channel 4's Time Team favourite Phil Harding
  • Take part in activities for the whole family
  • Plus lots more to see, do and discover!
 
For more details contact Laura Joyner
 
1722

1723

 
How to find us
Drive north on the A345 from the Amesbury junction of the A303, crossing one roundabout. Turn right at the 'C' tank crossing and follow signs to the parking area. Please note that the site is a 15-minute walk from the parking area. Limited spaces are available at the site for those with walking difficulties. 
 
1724
19 May 2014
UK Archaeology Conferences
In, Out and In Between: Dynamics of Cultural Borders
17/10/2012-19/10/2012: Session focussing on dialectical relations between culture, social relations and landscape, with special interest in the reflections of ethnic boundaries in material culture..
03 Jul 2012
Computing, GIS and Archaeology in the UK
Portable GIS vs OSGeo Live
Over the last couple of weeks, a few people have asked me the same question, which is (to paraphrase) “what’s the difference between Portable GIS and OSGeo Live or USB GIS?”. You get asked something once, and that’s fine, but more than that and it’s worth a blog post! The main difference between the two [...]
23 Mar 2012
Archaeology News
Scientists discover Oetzi's last meal
Oetzi's body was discovered in 1991 inside a glacier near the mountainous border between Italy and Austria, where it had been naturally mummified about 5300 years ago. Previous analysis concluded...
18 Dec 2011
Professional GIS / GPS Developers Google Group
New stable version of gvSIG Desktop available: gvSIG 1.9
A new stable version of gvSIG Desktop has been released: gvSIG Desktop
1.9.

It's available on the Downloads section of the gvSIG website:
[link].

This new version has many new features which are listed next.

12 Nov 2009
Online Archaeology Blog
OPEN ARCHIVE - a new web based system for accessing our past
The wealth of information gathered by local archaeological groups and societies on excavations, surveys and documentary research is one of the important sources of data for the study of archaeology in the UK. Currently, this archive of British archaeology is stored locally, within libraries and local history centres as well as with the originating group [...]
16 Sep 2009
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